Our Year in Review, a Blog for Davos, an Interview with Tensie Whelan on Sustainability and Business and More: Ethical Systems January Newsletter

Our Year in Review, a Blog for Davos, an Interview with Tensie Whelan on Sustainability and Business and More: Ethical Systems January Newsletter

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2016 End of Year Letter from Jonathan Haidt

The world is hungry for new ideas on how to improve business ethics in ways that do not rely as heavily as before on detailed rules formulated by legislatures and regulators. There is a desperate need to help businesses become more self-regulating, in ways that will protect multiple stakeholders while increasing the dynamism and profitability of the business.

That is exactly what Ethical Systems is doing and we have made great progress towards our goals in 2016. See what next year will bring >>

Ethics Scholar Interview: Tensie Whelan, Clinical Professor and Director of the Center for Sustainable Business at NYU-Stern

Our research is showing that creating value for employees, suppliers, customers, shareholders and the planet is good business and more likely to create profits over the longer term. Don’t fall into the short-term shareholder value creation trap!

Learn more about the Center for Sustainable Business and why sustainability is both intrinsically ethical and drives more ethical behavior in organizations >>

Ethical systems design: what smart leaders are using to improve their organizations (and the world)

Our CEO Azish Filabi and Founder-Director Jonathan Haidt co-author a piece for the World Economic Forum (Davos conference) blog illustrating how we can make leadership more ethical by harnessing the power of ethical systems design.

Read the blog via the WEF website >>

MBA: Means Being Aware to Short-Termism

A new study shows that for MBA-holders who go on to lead companies and achieve a level of recognition in mainstream media, self-interested behavior becomes more apparent and their firms can suffer as a result.

See how the findings have implications for executive compensation, the dangers of short-termism and how the drive to be distinguished among peers may create a blind spot when thinking about other areas of the business >>

The (Il)legitimacy of Compliance?

Crossposted from NYU Law's Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement Blog.

By Donald C. Langevoort of Georgetown University School of Law.

To me, an especially important lesson is how compliance norms—when filtered by groups under stress—can be perceived as illegitimate.  Messages from senior executives and compliance officials may be well-intended, but construed as unfair when they fail to acknowledge the harshness of the tension between sales pressures and the compliance commands. 

See how ethics and compliance norms from on high fade in the face of situational frames >>

2016 Collaborator Recap

Browse a highlight list of the research, articles, appearances and talks from our collaborators that helped advance our mission and promote a greater understanding of ethics, decision making, and ethical systems design.​
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