Middle management, a new one sheet on Motivated Reasoning, an interview with Francesca Gino on Rebel Talent & More: Ethical Systems' May Newsletter

Middle management, a new one sheet on Motivated Reasoning, an interview with Francesca Gino on Rebel Talent & More: Ethical Systems' May Newsletter

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Interview with Francesa Gino: An interview with the author of Rebel Talent  on ethics, culture and breaking the rules


Some might argue that we are in a current period of great rebellion towards the status quo and polarization. Why is now the right time to talk about why being a rebel is good? 

"The world is becoming more uncertain and the types of problems we are asked to think through are more complex. The world is also divided. There is much polarization, and we often do not seem to get along well, no matter how simple or complex the issue at hand is. Rebels adapt to changing conditions easily as they enjoy what comes with novel and challenging situations. Their curiosity is an important ingredient to help them stay agile and flexible."

Learn more about being a rebel in our interview and how rebellion can bring you joy >>
 

New Behavioral Science One Sheet: Motivated Reasoning

Our behavioral science one-sheets are designed to connect behavioral science concepts to daily workflow and organizational cultures.

Our newest topic is "Motivated Reasoning" explaining how the process by which we make decisions is less like a judge who carefully evaluates all the facts and arrives at a well-reasoned judgment and more like a lawyer who advocates for a particular outcome.

See this and our entire series of behavioral science one sheets >>

Creating and Maintaining a Healthy Corporate Culture: RANE Podcast with Azish Filabi


In this podcast, (Risk Assessment Network + Exchange) RANE’s Serina Vash sits down with Azish Filabi, Executive Director, Ethical Systems, to discuss what drives a healthy corporate culture and best practices for creating and maintaining that culture.

"It is important to have senior leaders understanding the research and the long-term impact of not dealing with the issues that are going on. ...We want to give the ethics communities additional tools to advocate for what they see as the right thing to do in an organization." -Azish Filabi

Listen to the complete podcast and see further quotes on the Ethical Systems site >>

Middle Meddling: Management and Ethics


New research from ES collab Linda Trevino and others provides a clear example of how behavior and tone in the middle can outweigh the intent of senior leaders.

Their new study demonstrates how managers play a key role in both filtering information up to senior leaders as well as pressuring subordinates.

See a summary and link to the full research report >>
 

Ask an Ethics Expert: Christine Allen


Question for Christine Allen our featured April / May expert. See more questions and answers online!
 
Q) By most accounts the CEO and founder of our company is kind, professional and well-intentioned. At each company meeting, a great deal of time is devoted to extolling our company values. Recently we raised an obscene amount of money (even though we were told this wouldn't be necessary for a while) from a Middle Eastern country's sovereign fund. Since practically every headline and deed from that country contradicts my values do I just quit?  I would almost prefer to sandbag my performance there to do harm to the country's "investment" although it would hurt my co-workers. I feel it rises to an act of complicity to continue working w/ this hypocritical group. How do I reconcile my ideals and the values of the company here?
 
A) Your question raises more questions for me than answers so I will begin with those.  First, you use the language “by most accounts” when referring to the CEO’s behaviors and values—are there differing accounts of the CEO’s behavior that lead you to question the perceptions of the CEO?  Have you had direct experiences with the CEO that contradict a reputation as “kind, professional and well-intentioned”?  

I am concerned as well about your use of the term “extolling” in describing the discussion of company values in meetings. It is, of course, different to reinforce the importance of company values or to ensure decisions are in alignment with company values than it is to use meetings simply to pat the company on the back or to brag about company values.  It is critical that values not be simply a “plaque on the wall.” Your description here implies this may be the case.  Are the company's values reflected in company actions most of the time?


Read the rest of this answer and other insights >>

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