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Making ethics easy: New essay in Ethisphere with Jeff Kaplan

Collaborator Jeff Kaplan and I just published a 3 page guide in Ethisphere Magazine outlining how companies can begin using EthicalSystems.org to create a workplace with higher levels of trust among colleagues and leadership. Ethisphere has kindly allowed us to post a PDF of the article. 

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Our first year

EthicalSystems.org is almost one year old, and like all one-year-olds, it has grown a lot in its first year. When we launched the site in January, we had 18 collaborators, 14 research pages, and no real budget. But we were bound together by the belief that the massive body of research on ethics in organizations could and should be synthesized and made accessible, for free, to the business community, regulators, and the general public.

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2014 Highlights from Our Collaborators

2014 was a busy year. Here are some of the highlights from our collaborators.

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How do people change their minds about issues?

How do people change their minds about issues?

A respected colleague asked over lunch and it prompted me to write some thoughts down.  Belief change and behavior change (page on that coming soon) can both be instrumental in ethical systems design so it seemed appropriate to share our Cliffs Notes on belief change here.

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The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See

The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See  

By Max H. Bazerman

Simon and Schuster (2014)

Summarized by Bryan Turner

 

What if you had the ability to make better decisions and all you had to do was to make slight adjustments in how you analyze issues?  Well, this ability (noticing) exists, and The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See shows you how to cultivate it.

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Conflicts of interest, corruption and fraud: what are the connections?

[This essay was originally posted on the Conflict of Interest Blog]

Whether one is drafting a code of conduct or other C&E policy documents, developing training, designing audit protocols,  conducting a risk or program assessment or creating C&E metrics, it may be useful to bear in mind the relationships between COIs, corruption and fraud – particularly given the extent of overlap among these areas.  The following is offered as an overview of these connections, but note that these are intended only as general principles under US law; aspects of the analysis may differ under various other countries’ legal regimes, and even  some aspects of US law itself.

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Is Wall Street a bad ethical neighborhood?

[This essay was originally posted on the Conflict of Interest Blog]

For many years I taught ethics in the executive MBA program of a New York area business school. Because of the school’s location, the “day job” for many of the students was in the financial services field, and on average they seemed less ethics-focused than did the others.  I did not find this surprising – since for many years my “day job” was as a white collar criminal defense lawyer, and a disproportionate number of my clients were from that same industry.

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Featured Expert of the Month: Max Bazerman

Interview with Professor and Author Max Bazerman 

What is the main research themes for which you are known?

I believe that I am best known to different groups of scholars for different chunks of work. 

Perhaps the research of mine that other scholars first noticed was my integration of the field of behavioral decision research (aka behavioral economics, behavioral insights, etc.) for a managerial audience. Many leading scholars had their first exposure to the field by reading my book Judgment in Managerial Decision Making (now in its 8th edition, with Don Moore). I published the first edition in 1986, when business schools were not yet paying attention to the revolution created by the insights of Kahneman and Tversky.

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City-Level Business Ethics

[Editor’s note: We at EthicalSystems.org have been so pleased to learn about the activities of the Omaha Business Ethics Alliance that we invited its executive director, Beverly Kracher, to write a guest blog post introducing the Alliance. Cities are indeed an important and usually overlooked level in the nested systems that one should look at when doing ethical systems design.]

Guest post by Beverly Kracher, PhD, the Robert B. Daugherty Endowed Chair in Business Ethics & Society at Creighton University and Executive Director and President of the Business Ethics Alliance.

Since its inception, the discipline of business ethics has focused on strategies to help business leaders, organizations, professional associations, industry groups, and nations. But there is a missing ingredient in this recipe for keeping ethics front-of-mind and grappling with major business issues. I call it city-level business ethics.

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Risk assessment: law, economics, morality science…and liquor

[This essay was originally posted on the Conflict of Interest Blog]

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